Posts tagged
‘Victorian mourning’

Kiss the Corpse and Then You Die

Kiss the Corpse and Then You Die The custom of kissing the corpse often led to death from infectious disease.

Transparent Fiction – The Myth of the Victorian Tear Bottle

Transparent Fiction – The Myth of the Victorian Tear Bottle In which textual sources are used to put the stopper in the tear-bottle myth.

The Woman in Black – Victorian Mourning as Criminal Disguise

The Woman in Black – Victorian Mourning as Criminal Disguise A look at the rogues’ gallery of crimes committed in the United States from about 1860 to 1929 under the cover of crape by The Women in Black.

Sewing Shrouds: 19th-century Burial Clothing

Sewing Shrouds: 19th-century Burial Clothing .In search of what the well-dressed corpse is wearing, I ask the question, “Who made dresses for the dead?” and find a series of candid articles about the 19th-century shroud industry.

Mourning Becomes Elective: Musings on mourning customs

Mourning becomes elective Some musings on Victorian mourning customs, historic calls for funerary reforms, and a modest proposal for a return to formal mourning.

The Woman in Black of Massillon, Ohio: Part 2

A few days ago I wrote about a Woman in Black haunting the town of Massillon in 1895. The town was in a fever of excitement and a young man, ill-advisedly impersonating the ghost, was wounded when shot by a friend. Here is the thrilling conclusion to that tale.